2018 Bus Trip to PhotoPlus

Lancaster Camera Club (LCC) is again organizing a bus trip to the PhotoPlus Expo in New York City (NYC) on Friday, October 26, 2018.

Even though we are traveling to and from NYC as a group, you will be free to do whatever you want to do for the entire day! The bus will leave Lancaster Shopping Center, AC Moore/Oregon Pike side at 6:30 AM and take you to the PhotoPlus Expo at the Jacob Javits Convention Center (655 W. 34th St.). For the return trip to Lancaster there will be two pickup points: behind the Winter Garden Theater (7th Avenue & 51st St.) at 6:15 p.m. and at the Javits Center at 6:30 p.m.

The cost of the bus trip for Lancaster Camera Club members is $45 per person and $50 per person for nonmembers.

Click here for more information and to sign up. 2018 Bus Trip

An Invitation to SoFoBoMo 2015

In the Fall of 2012, a small group of Lancaster photographers decided to try a local “Solo Photo Book Month” project. Since then 10 photographers have published 19 PDF photo books at the LIPG SoFoBoMo Project website. Over half of the 19 SoFoBoMo books already published there have had more than 200 page views each.

For 2015 we’re expanding our local SoFoBoMo by inviting all interested photographers to participate. To learn more about how to participate, please visit:

http://sofobomo-lipg.blogspot.com/search/label/Welcome

The Solo Photo Book Month, commonly known as SoFoBoMo, is an experience designed to allow you to practice the skills you need to plan, execute, and publish photo projects. Inspired by the principle that “what we need to learn to do, we learn by doing,” Paul Butzi launched the first SoFoBoMo in 2008. After four successful years in which hundreds of participants, world-wide, produced over 900 PDF ebooks, Paul decided that he could no longer maintain the original SoFoBoMo web site and shut it down in late 2011. We are continuing what he started.

Please join us this year. We are all looking forward to seeing your photo ebook.

–Pat Cooney

An Invitation to SoFoBoMo 2013

Working on a photo project is a good way to take your photography to the next level. A natural endpoint for any such project is a sequence of thematically and stylistically related photos, often in the form of a photo book. As in many endeavors, the best way to master these skills is to practice them.

The Solo Photo Book Month, commonly known as SoFoBoMo, is an experience designed to allow you to hone the skills you’ll need to plan, execute, and publish photo projects. Inspired by the principle that “what we need to learn to do, we learn by doing,” Paul Butzi launched the Solo Photo Book Month in 2008. After four successful years in which hundreds of participants, world-wide, produced over 900 PDF ebooks, Paul decided that he could no longer maintain the original SoFoBoMo web site and shut it down in late 2011.

In the Fall of 2012, a small group of Lancaster photographers (the LIPG) who enjoyed past SoFoBoMo books decided to try a local SoFoBoMo project. Five photographers participated in this trial run. You can download any or all of their five SoFoBoMo ebooks here.

For 2013 we’ve decided to expand our local SoFoBoMo by inviting all interested photographers who live in South Central Pennsylvania to participate. To learn more about how to participate, please visit our SoFoBoMo 2013 web page.

–Pat Cooney

SoFoBoMo – The Solo Photo Book Month Project

If you’re like me, much of what you know about photography, photographers, and photographs has come from books. But few, if any, of these books directly address the skills and techniques needed to turn a group of photos into an effective, informative, and pleasing photo book.

Inspired by the principle that “what we need to learn to do, we learn by doing,” Paul Butzi launched the Solo Photo Book Month (SoFoBoMo) five years ago. After four successful years in which hundreds of participants, world-wide, produced over 900 PDF e-books, Paul decided that he could no longer maintain his SoFoBoMo web site and shut it down in late 2011.

As a participant in Paul’s original SoFoBoMo project, I produced three SoFoBoMo photo e-books, one each in 2009, 2010, and 2011. In the process, I learned a great deal about shooting, selecting, and sequencing a (hopefully) coherent set of photographs, writing supporting text, and producing and publishing a finished e-book.

This Fall, a small group of Lancaster photographers who enjoyed past SoFoBoMo books decided to try a local SoFoBoMo project. I volunteered to make a web home for the project. You can visit it at

http://sofobomo-lipg.blogspot.com

where you will find more background information on how SoFoBoMo works and links to download this year’s locally produced PDF e-books.

If you would be interested in participating in a local SoFoBoMo in 2013, let me know in an email to sofobomo (at) gmail (dot) com. With enough interest I hope we can have another local SoFoBoMo next year.

–Pat Cooney

First Friday Photography Venues for 2012-08-03

Here’s a list of Lancaster City venues that I believe will be showing some photographs this First Friday, August 3rd:

Smith LaVia Studio
Suite 210, 329 N Queen St,
A free Toy Photography Workshop hosted by John M Flinchbaugh: Anyone interested is welcome to just stop by with toys and camera in hand. We’ll be working on composition, story-telling, and lighting.

Demuth Museum
120 E. King St.
Infinite Ubiquitous: A selection of photographs from Lancaster native Victoria Sambunaris, product of ten years’ worth of yearly journeys across America and her fascination with the American landscape.  Gallery talk with the artist on First Friday, beginning at 6:30 pm.
Also on view “Becoming Modern – the Travel Drawings of Louis I. Kahn and Charles Demuth.”

Annex 24 Gallery*
24 W. Walnut St.
Circles and Poles, Inside & Out: Colorful paintings and captivating photography by artists Spazz Arcane, Wolfgang VonSheidy, Don Otto, Steigal Glassworks, K. Scott Kreider, Lori Lee, Eddie Rehm, Spindle & PSire, Fracoise Nagel, Kathy Kramer, Mary Reising, Ted Rasmussen, Loryn Spangler-Jones, Ray Kellen, and Vintage Vinyl Journals.  Meet the artists.

j. a. sharp Custom Jeweler
322 N. Queen St.
Creating Meaning: Photographs taken in and around Lancaster City by Alyson Earl that reveal the stories and magic inherent in everyday places and things.  Handcrafted jewelry in precious metals and stones by Jude Sharp and other regional artisans. Open until 8pm.

Lancaster Public Library*
125 N. Duke St.
Life Rafts: Throughout his career, Robert Reed has photographed former presidents, famous actors and professional athletes. But, more than anything else, he has photographed skateboarders. The skateboarding images in this show come direct from the drainage ditches of Texas, the streets of Philadelphia and other places in southeastern Pennsylvania. Meet the artist. Open 5:30-8 pm.

Mulberry Art Studios*
19-21 N. Mulberry St.
Frozen in Time: Lonny Van Booven’s photography captures the simple beauty of nature, the robust colors of flowers and the history of various places.
Scenes From a Walk: Local artist Lindsey Stauffer’s watercolor paintings reflect her appreciation of nature and small-town life.
Preview of artwork to be auctioned August 10 by Boltz Auctions.
Meet the artists 5-8pm.

Pennsylvania College of Art & Design*
204 N. Prince St.
Gail Anderson: designer, writer, teacher, hoarder: The former art director at Rolling Stone magazine shares her designs alongside sources of inspiration–her bottle cap collection, sculptures made from alphabet letters, and photographs of unique typography found on hand-painted, neon, and storefront signs across America.

The Ware Center*
Millersville University Lancaster, 42 N. Prince St.
1. Intrigue: Juried exhibition of artworks thematically related to the concept of “intrigue.”  5-8pm
2. The Artwork of Stephen Barnett:  Photographs are juxtaposed with lattice-cut poplar wood, then enhanced with found objects and color.  Meet the artist 6-8pm.

Pariah Fine Art
113 N. Water St.
Grand Opening: Known for their dark interpretation of the Pennsylvania landscape and figurative works, Pariah Fine Art is the new home of the work of artist couple Jody and Cheryl Fallon. Pariah Fine Art features original oils, watercolors, pastels and sculpture by Jody Fallon and photographic works by Cheryl Fallon.

The Painted Desert Gallery
227 N. Duke St.
Artist Invitational Exhibition: Celebrating the three-year anniversary of the Invitational with a selection of representative works from 25 artists, ranging from photography to paintings to clay and iron works.  Meet the artists.

Edwin P. Huddle Photography
122 E. Chestnut St.
Fine art photography, photo décor, and commissioned portraits.

Framing Concept
328 N. Queen St.
ArtsySide Beyond the Ordinary: Photography and landscapes by Denn Hollandsmith. Meet the artist.

Nick Gould Photography
104 W. Chestnut St., 2nd fl.
Fine art photography and portraits.

*Wheelchair Accessible

–Pat Cooney

The Art of Photographic Lighting by Eib Eibelshaeuser – Rocky Nook, O’Reilly

This book is really more a reference encyclopedia than a textbook.

The author is clearly very knowledgeable about light theory, the history of light, and the different types of lights that are available. I suspect much of the basic information provided on the different construction of various light bulbs will neither be of interest nor much use to most photographers.

However, there are several valuable chapters such as “Light and Shade” and “Controlling Light” that are well worth reading. In addition the sections on hard and soft light, direct and indirect light are very useful.

I feel this is an excellent supplementary text for anyone learning photographic lighting. For schools teaching photography, I’d recommend they include this book in their libraries.

Photoshop Elements 10 – the missing manual, Barbara Brundage, O’Reilly Publishers

Highly recommended I have been teaching Photoshop Elements since version 7 and have used Ms. Brundage’s series of books for version 7, 8, and 9. This book is an A to Z manual on Photoshop Elements. One feature I particularly like is that the author lists a number of websites for additional material such as plug-ins. Also, she will reference a book not published by O’Reilly, an action for which both the author and publisher deserve credit.

As the author states in her introduction, this is a how and when book. The book instructs one how to use various techniques and tools, as well as when not to use them. In addition to the book content, one can go to the O’Reilly website to download additional material that is pertinent so that one can better complete various exercises in the book.

The bottom line; if you use Photoshop Elements 10, buy this book.

Charles Heisterkamp, III, M.D.

Photographer

THE SUNNY 16 RULE

A PRESCRIPTION FOR BETTER PHOTOGRAPHS

 In photography, the Sunny 16 rule (also known as the Sunny f/16 rule) is a method of estimating correct daylight exposures without a light meter. Apart from the obvious advantage of independence from a light meter, the Sunny 16 rule can also aid in achieving correct exposure of difficult subjects. As the rule is based on incident light, rather than reflected light as with most camera light meters, very bright or very dark subjects are compensated for. The rule serves as a mnemonic for the camera settings obtained on a sunny day using the exposure value (EV) system.

The basic rule is, “On a sunny day set aperture to f/16 and shutter speed to the [reciprocal of the] ISO film speed [or ISO setting] for a subject in direct sunlight.” For example:

On a sunny day and with ISO 100 film / setting in the camera, one sets the aperture to f/16 and the shutter speed to 1/100 or 1/125 second (on some cameras 1/125 second is the available setting nearest to 1/100 second).

On a sunny day with ISO 200 film / setting and aperture at f/16, set shutter speed to 1/200 or 1/250.

On a sunny day with ISO 400 film / setting and aperture at f/16, set shutter speed to 1/400 or 1/500.

As with other light readings, shutter speed can be changed as long as the f-number is altered to compensate, e.g. 1/250 second at f/11 gives equivalent exposure to 1/125 second at f/16.

An elaborated form of the Sunny 16 rule is to set shutter speed nearest to the reciprocal of the ISO film speed / setting and f-number according to this table:

Aperture 

Lighting Conditions 

Shadow Detail 

f/22 

Snow/Sand 

Dark with sharp edges 

/16 

Sunny 

Distinct 

f/11 

Slight Overcast 

Soft around edges 

f/8 

Overcast 

Barely visible 

f/5.6 

Heavy Overcast 

No shadows 

f/4 

Open Shade/Sunset 

No shadows 

Add One Stop 

Backlighting 

n/a 

from Wikipedia

 

CHARLES HEISTERKAMP, III, M.D.

 

 

A PRESCRIPTION FOR WHAT’S ON THE NET

LESS ORDINARY – http://www.lessordinary.org.uk/

“By taking the time to browse through the posts here, you’ll find plenty of beautiful photographs, thoughtful reflections and inspirational content, as I communicate my deep passion for specialness.”

Photography, Books, an unusual Blog. Worth a visit. You might be inspired.

Charles Heisterkamp, III, M.D. – Photographer